College Planning

  • FAQ's (Frequently Asked Questions)

    What should be accomplished during the freshman/sophomore year to stay on track for college?
    What should I keep in mind when selecting my classes?
    What do I need to understand about developing my transcript?
    How should I incorporate the development of skills, interests and experiences?
     
    Freshman-Sophomore College Planning Calendar


    What should be accomplished during the freshman/sophomore year to stay on track for college?

    There are three areas to consider over these years:
    • Course selection
    • Transcript development
    • Develop skills, interests and experiences

    What should I keep in mind when selecting my classes?


    There are three areas to keep in mind when selecting your courses for the following year: college entrance requirements, basic skills and interests.
    • While entrance requirements vary, most schools require core college preparation courses. Planning your high school curriculum early will ensure that these requirements are met.
    • Master the basics. If you are lacking basic skills, you may have to take remedial courses in college or develop your study skills. Remedial courses in college do not give credit for these required classes, but you will have to pay full tuition fees nonetheless.
    • Explore your interests via your classes. Self-evaluate! Whether it is science, history, English, business, math, home economics, technology, art or foreign language, your classes give you a chance to find out what you like. That will help you determine your major (or a realistic starting point once you get to college.)

    What do I need to understand about developing my transcript?

    Remember you begin developing your transcript as soon as you begin taking high school courses. The transcript contains the following: completed courses, final grades, regents exam grades, credit awarded, class rank, cumulative grade average, college entrance exam scores (ACT/SAT) and Advanced Placement Scores. The cumulative grade average and class rank are key factors in college admissions decisions. Your day-to-day work is the most important factor. A good work ethic is key to success in life. Therefore, doing your best is vital! Furthermore, grades are important, but so is the difficulty of the courses you take. Instead of going for the easy 'A', choose tougher more rigorous courses. Students who accept the challenge of academically stimulating classes make a statement that learning is important.


    How should I incorporate the development of skills, interests and experiences?

    Keep in mind that the development of these three areas is not limited to the classroom. Explore the following: volunteering, extra-curricular activities or part-time job, leadership, independent intellectual pursuits and computer literacy.
    • Volunteer! The experience adds valuable information as you choose a career. Also, many scholarships require community service. Moreover, many colleges look favorably upon community service activities.
    • Pursue extra-curricular activities or a part-time job. These activities prove you are a well-rounded individual who will bring a lot to a college community. Moreover, a variety of activities also indicates that you know how to mange your time efficiently.
    • Pursue leadership roles.
    • Further your own intellectual pursuits independently. Read and study on your own. Develop your own intellectual interests outside of class. Improve your language skills and test scores by reading.
    • Become computer literate. Take computer science courses, go to computer camp or work to learn at home or school. Knowing your way around a computer will definitely come in handy in college and in the working world.

    What other areas should I think about to stay on track for college?
    • Develop a student resume as you begin to progress through high school.
    • Attend College Information Day at the Arnot Mall in October of each year.
    • Prepare for the fall PSAT test in the spring of the sophomore year by taking a practice PSAT.
    • Athletes, begin requesting information from colleges.
     
     
     
     
    Documents found on this site are PDF documents, so you'll need Adobe Reader installed on your computer in order to view these documents. If you don't have Adobe Reader installed, you can download it for free by clicking on the following link: http://get.adobe.com/reader/